Showing posts with label George and Robert Stephenson. Show all posts
Showing posts with label George and Robert Stephenson. Show all posts

Wednesday, May 31, 2017

George Stephenson Monument Newcastle


George Stephenson Monument, Newcastle.

The monument stands near Newcastle's Central Station and was designed by local sculpture John Graham Lough & unvieled in 1862 .
This memorial shows George Stephenson "The Father of the Railways" with an engineering plan in his hand.
The four characters shown near the base of the statue represent an engineer, a blacksmith, a miner with a safety lamp (another Stephenson design) and a plate layer with the type of rail also invented by Stephenson.
Further photos of the history of George and Robert Stephenson.
Please click on each image for the full size photo.

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Sunday, April 02, 2017

Stephenson Railway Museum North Shields


Stephenson Railway Museum, North Shields. 

The Stephenson Railway Museum was created in honour of George Stephenson, a son of Tyneside and the "Father of the Railways".
To see further photos of the history of George and Robert Stephenson please click here.
Please click on each image for the full size photo. 

Stephenson Railway Museum

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Stephenson Railway Museum

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Stephenson Railway Museum

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Tuesday, December 27, 2016

Morpeth Northumberland Countryside


Morpeth, Northumberland Countryside.

Pictures taken during a winter walk around the countryside of Morpeth. The railway viaduct was built in 1850 and was designed by the great Tyneside engineer Robert Stephenson.
Please click on each image for the full size photo. 

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Wednesday, January 27, 2016

Newcastle Central Railway Station


Newcastle Central Railway Station. 

Newcastle Central Station was opened in 1850 by Queen Victoria and is a grade one listed building.
The station is nationally important and serves the East Coast Main Line between London and Edinburgh as well as being connected  to Carlisle and Middlesbrough.
In addition there are trans pennine services to Manchester and Liverpool & trains from Newcastle go as far as Penzance.
Newcastle Central is also served by an underground station on the Tyne & Wear Metro system.
The station was built with 3 curved, arched spans which were the first of their kind and this design was copied by other stations.
Newcastle Central was designed by John Dobson in collaboration with the great Tyneside engineer Robert Stephenson, who was the son of George Stephenson the "Father of the Railways". Robert Stephenson also was responsible for the Newcastle High Level Bridge, which was the first combined road and rail bridge in the world. Photos of that structure can be seen here

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Wednesday, September 24, 2014

George Stephenson's Dial Cottage


George Stephenson's Dial Cottage, Killingworth, Newcastle.

Although great Tyneside engineer George Stephenson "The Father of the Railways" was born in Wylam he moved to Dial Cottage, Kilingworth at the age of 23 with his wife and son Robert who also went on to have a distinguished career in engineering himself. Stephenson was illiterate until the age of 18 and was entirely self taught.
His genius started to become evident when he built his first locomotive, the Blucher, at the colliery workshop behind his home.
He also designed one of the first miners safety lamps but when he went to London to promote his lamp at a Parliamentary committee they refused to believe someone from such a humble background and strong Tyneside accent could have invented this lamp and choose the rival Humphrey Davy design instead. He developed deep mistrust of London from this time. 
However the miners of the North East stayed loyal to Stephenson's lamp and it is said this is where the name Geordies came from to describe North East people.
For pictures of the George Stephenson monument in Newcastle please click here.
Please click on each image for the full size photo.